Here`s a broken down list of thirty years of disagreement Hamilton`s son, Philip, 19, was killed in November 1801 in a duel near present-day Jersey City, following Philip`s conflict with George Eacker, a Democratic Republican Republican who defamed Philip`s father in a speech. Hamilton Sr.`s strong sense of personal honour had led him to pose several challenges earlier in his life that could have given rise to duels, but not through negotiation; Yet he had come to oppose duels with Christian principles. He advised Philip to save his honor without taking the risk of killing his opponent by “throwing his shot” and shooting in the air first, hoping his opponent would reconsider the consequences. At first, Philippe did not raise his gun, but when he did, Eacker mortally wounded him. Burr`s shot hit Hamilton in the abdominal area above his right hip, broke a rib, tore through his diaphragm and liver, and got stuck in his spine. Burr began to head towards Hamilton, perhaps with a look of regret on his face, but Van Ness soon removed him and pierced his face in front of potential witnesses. After already declared himself a dead man, Hamilton was repatriated to Manhattan, where he survived for about 31 hours, most often in the presence of his family, before dying. Soon under threat of murder prosecution, Burr fled, first to Philadelphia, but eventually in shame, when he would never be tried for murder. He hoped to restore his reputation and political career through a duel with Hamilton; Instead, he erased it. I have matured on the subject of your letter of the 18th.

I thought for a moment, and the more I thought, the more convinced I am that I could not make the confession or denial that you deem necessary without an apparent incongruity. Burr was waiting at the steep blades (roughly across the river from West 42nd Street) when Hamilton arrived at 7.m. with his second-in-command, Nathaniel Pendleton, an Independent War veteran and judge in the Georgia District Court, along with Dr. David Hosack, professor of medicine and botany at Columbia College (now Columbia University). Duels were illegal in both New York and New Jersey, but they were treated less harshly in New Jersey, so Burr and Hamilton had gone to Weehawken for an isolated rocky outcroo about twenty feet above the Hudson River, a place that had become a popular duel ground. Most of the time, matters of honor that could have given rise to duels were settled through careful negotiations. However, the exchange of letters between Burr and Hamilton degenerated into hostility to a point of no return, beginning with Hamilton`s clinical response to Burr`s first accusatory response. . . .