Donald Anthony Low and Robert Cranford Pratt wrote in Buganda and British Overrule 1900-1955 that few agreements “were of such importance. Few people were so detailed, few of them acquired such importance in the relationship with the colonial colonies. The illustration of the area under discussion shows that the signing of the Buganda Agreement has led to changes in Uganda`s politics and social way of life. The signing of Buganda`s arrangement safad the kabaka forces when the kabakaship functions were swept away: he lost his say in the lands of Buganda. He could no longer appoint leaders without the consent of the protectorate administration, and other ideas that your government was centered on the territory were swept away. In areas like Busoga, Kigezi and Ankole, existing political configurations have been mixed and traditional leaders have all been positioned under the Western District Officer. These actions have raised the question among today`s freelance writers: “Did the flag follow the mix?” The 1900 agreement also had other consequences, including the allocation of Buganda, which was considered a privileged position in relations with the colonial government. (Although the British signed agreements with Toro in 1900 and with Ankole in 1901, they were not as detailed or privileged, while they did not bother to sign such agreements with the other territories that, over time, were part of the protectorate.) It should be noted that none of the other kingdoms had signed earlier treaties that recognized or accepted Britain`s protection, as Buganda had done. Unlike the treaties of 1893 and 1894, the Ugandan Agreement of 1900 contained clear boundaries of the Ugandan kingdom, a system of land ownership, and a fiscal policy. [3] The agreement was negotiated by Alfred Tucker, Bishop of Uganda,[5] signed among others by Buganda`s Catikiro Apollo Kagwa, on behalf of the kabaka (Daudi Cwa II), then a child, and Sir Harry Johnston, on behalf of the British colonial government.

Polka dot line. It was an agreement that established relations between Buganda and the British, but it also caused a political, economic revolution on land overnight and was to become a cog in the effort to create a republican state in Uganda. While Mwanga, like Kabaka, had mobilized more than 2,000 weapons in his revolt less than five years earlier, his son and successors could only have less than a tenth — and they were asking the British for licenses. Second, the agreement attempted to outline a legal framework defining the role of the Lukiiko, who would in fact now share power with the Kabaka. Here too, the British gave with one hand and took with the other; While the Kabaka had the power to appoint honoraria that sat on the Council with district chiefs, it could not dismiss them without the agreement of colonial officials. 5. Laws passed by Her Majesty`s Government for the general management of the Protectorate of Uganda shall also apply to the Kingdom of Uganda, unless they are in particular contradiction with the provisions of this Agreement, in which case the provisions of this Agreement shall constitute a special exception to the Kingdom of Uganda. . . .