Agreement or concord (abbreviated agr) occurs when a word changes shape, depending on the other words it refers to. [1] This is a case of inflection and normally implies that the value of a grammatical category (such as gender or person) “matches” between different words or parts of the sentence. (But sometimes it`s best to rephrase these grammatically correct but complicated sentences.) Case agreement is not an essential feature of English (only personnel pronouns and pronouns that have casus marking). The correspondence between these pronouns can sometimes be observed: Substantive-pronomic concordance: Number and orientation of sex Spoken French always distinguishes the plural of the second person and the first person plural in the formal language and the rest of the present in all but all verbs in the first conjugation (Infinitive in -er). The plural form of the first person and the pronoun (nous) are now generally replaced in modern French by the pronoun on (literally: “un”) and a singular form of the third person. This is how we work (formally) on the work. In most verbs of other conjugations, each person in the plural can be distinguished between them and singular forms, again when the traditional first person is used in the plural. The other endings that appear in written English (that is: all the singulated endings and also the third person plural of verbs that are not with the infinitesi-il) are often pronounced in the same way, except in connection contexts. Irregular verbs such as be, fair, all and have significantly more pronounced forms of concordance than normal verbs. Most Slavic languages are very volatile, with the exception of Bulgarian and Macedonian. The correspondence is similar to Latin, for example between adjectives and nouns in gender, number, uppercase and lowercase (if counted as a separate category). The following examples come from the Serbokroatic: in Hungarian, verbs have a polypersonal correspondence, which means that they correspond to more than one of the arguments of the verb: not only with its subject, but also with its object (battery).

There is a distinction between the case where there is a particular object and the case where the object is indeterminate or where there is no object at all. (Adverbians have no influence on the form of the verb.) Examples: Szeretek (I like someone or something unspecified), more (I love him, she, she or she, in particular), szeretlek (I love you); szeret (he loves me, us, you, someone or something indeterminate), szereti (he loves him, him or her specifically). Of course, names or pronouns can specify the exact object. In short, there is a correspondence between a verb and the person and the number of its subject and the specificity of its object (which often relates more or less precisely to the person). There is also a correspondence in sex between pronouns and precursors. Examples of this can be found in English (although English pronouns mainly follow natural sex and not sex grammatically): Note also the concordance which shows that it is even in the subjunctive mood. Concordance usually involves the concordance of the value of a grammatical category between different elements of a sentence (or sometimes between sentences, as in some cases where a pronoun is needed to match its predecessor or speaker). Some categories that often trigger grammatical concordance are listed below. “Agreement is an important process in many languages, but in modern English it is superfluous, a remnant of a richer system that flourished in ancient English…