Many collaborative marketing strategies are often confused. The elements that distinguish co-promotion from other marketing practices are: 3.2. 3.2. Multi-component co-promotion agreements are Chapter 2 – Trends in co-promotion and co-marketing This report contains a complete list of all co-promotion and co-marketing agreements announced since 2010, as indicated in the database of current agreements and alliances, including available financial conditions, as well as links to Online copies of the contractual documents of co-promotion and co-marketing actually filed with the Securities Exchange Commission by companies and their partners. Co-Promotion is a marketing practice that allows two or more companies to combine their sales reps to promote a product under the same brand and price with a unique marketing strategy. [1] It is considered one of the two main forms of joint marketing (calf 1988). Co-marketing is the other form and these terms are often confused. [2] This is done through an agreement (the co-promotion agreement)[3] which requires significant cooperation between the distribution and marketing organisations of the two companies. [4] One partner usually has a license to use the product and the other partner is the author or licensor.

[1] It helps the less developed sectors of a company to be covered by the assets of the partner company and thus increase the share of voice in the market of a product. [5] Co-promotion, a collaborative strategy, increases the attractiveness of consumers. It is a way to value products together. [4] Chapter 3 – Overview of the structure of co-promotion agreements When reviewing a co-promotion agreement, a company should consider other possible situations to maximize long-term flexibility, such as for example. B the maintenance of co-promotion rights as an option and not a firm commitment. [6] With the rise of biotechnology over the past two decades, licensing agreements have become an essential instrument in pharmaceutical companies` efforts to maintain a healthy product flow and access new technologies. As agreements have become more complex over the past decade, both biotech and pharmaceutical companies face a number of difficult decisions to make in licensing negotiations. Co-marketing still valuable Although Co-Promotion attracts more companies than co-marketing because of its potential to significantly increase the effectiveness of distribution forces, co-marketing offers more possibilities than expected. Co-marketing is particularly suitable for in-Licensers who face liquidity constraints due to the reduction in payments that the Out-Licenser expects to pay.

In co-marketing agreements at the beginning, the average maximum advance is US$16 million and the license fee is about 18%. . . .