In Guatemala, mass protests were violently repressed by the government, and in Costa Rica there were strikes against the trade deal. In addition, many Catholic bishops in Central America and the United States rejected the treaty, as did many social movements in the region. (Comparative Politics of Latin America (page 469), Daniel C. Hellinger) Nearly three-quarters of U.S. imports from Central America can be divided into three main categories: fruit (mainly bananas) and coffee; clothing; and integrated circuits. These three different categories are not marketed uniformly by the five countries for different reasons (see Table 1). First, Central America has traditionally exported bananas and coffee, which are dominated by Costa Rica and Guatemala. Coffee actually declined for all countries except Costa Rica, which accounts for only 3.8 percent of U.S. imports from the region.

This reflects the competitive nature of the coffee trade, which is grown in large quantities by Brazil, Colombia and African countries. The banana trade has also lost its importance, representing only 5.0% of US imports from Central America. During the congressional debate over its passage, SUPPORTERS OF THE FCTA promised that the agreement would bring economic prosperity to Central America, making it “the best immigration, anti-gang, and anti-drug policies at our disposal.” Today, THECAFTA countries Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala are plagued by drug-related gang violence and forced migration. Although the causes are multiple, “economic stagnation” has fueled the crisis, according to the US State Department. The CEFTA has clearly not kept its promise of economic growth for the region. The provisions relating to the intellectual property provisions of the DR-CEFTA go beyond those of the WTO. They stipulate that all companies will be treated equally and that THE CARFTA-DR countries ratify or accede to various international intellectual property agreements. Trademark owners benefit, among other things, from a transparent online registration process and a special system for resolving disputes related to Internet domain issues. Copyright regulations clarify the use of digital material (which goes beyond travel standards), including rights to temporary copies of works on computer (music, videos, software, text), exclusive copyright for the online supply of their works, extended protection periods for copyrighted documents, strict anti-containerization provisions to prohibit the manipulation of technologies, the requirement that governments use only legitimate computers. are used in accordance with the prohibition of unauthorized reception or distribution of encrypted satellite signals and the rules of liability of Internet service providers in case of copyright infringement. Patents and trade secrets comply with U.S. standards.

End-user piracy is criminalized and all parties are required to authorize the seizure, confiscation and destruction of counterfeit and pirated goods. THE CDFTA also requires legal damages for misuse of copyrighted material.52 CaFTA-DR is not expected to have much impact on the U.S. economy as a whole, given the relatively small size of Central American economies and the fact that most U.S. economies have a major impact on the U.S. economy as a whole. . . .